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Dementia

Dementia is the loss (usually gradual) of mental abilities such as thinking, remembering and reasoning. It is not a disease but a group of symptoms that may accompany some diseases or conditions affecting the brain. Dementia can affect us all at some point in our lives either by having it or caring for someone who has it.

Free support, information and advice is available for anyone affected by dementia through the new dementia service developed by Warrington Borough Council and the 5 Boroughs Partnership NHS Foundation Trust. It is also provided by the Alzheimer's Society.  

The Dementia Action Alliance (DAA) website has a Warrington partners page, which gives details of organisations locally who have signed up to be part of the DAA. 

There are also a number of support groups which provide an opportunity for both the carer and the cared for to meet other people who are living with dementia.

Knowing the early signs of dementia

Some of the following signs are often associated with the early onset of dementia:

  • Forgetting about recent conversations or events
  • Person repeats themselves
  • Becoming slower at grasping new ideas
  • Losing the thread of what is being said
  • Confusion which becomes more regular
  • Showing poor judgement and finding it harder to make decisions
  • Loss of interest in other people or activities
  • Developing a readiness to blame others for taking mislaid items
  • Becoming increasingly unwilling to try out new things or adapt to change

What will help?

There are many pieces of advice as to how you can cope and live with dementia. The Alzheimer’s Society recommends maintaining skills by:

  • Keeping things simple – It may help to simplify your routine, or daily tasks, to make them more manageable. Take things slowly, and don’t worry too much if some things seem hard.
  • Break things down into easier tasks
  • Practice things to try and improve your memory
  • Attend a course/local group to try and learn new skills (this can be just as good as remembering old ones!)

Try to:

  • Keep connected with friends and family
  • Keep active
  • Keep learning new things
  • Give to others e.g. volunteering or being a friend

Alzheimer's Society Warrington branch

For further information and support about living with dementia and to hear about advisory services and local groups please contact your local Alzheimer’s Society Office (Warrington Branch) on 0151 420 8010.

Dementia adviser service

If you or a person you know has been diagnosed as having dementia, the advisers can provide quality information and signposting tailored to the individuals need. 

Dementia support worker service 

The support worker can provide emotional support, information and guidance throughout the journey to you, as a carer or person with dementia, to enable you to live as independently as possible. 

Dementia café 

Meets on the first Wednesday of each month from 10am to 12pm at the Community Café, The Gateway, 89 Sankey Street, Warrington WA1 1SR

Come along to meet others in a similar situation in a relaxed social setting.  Friendly Alzheimer's Society staff and volunteers will be on hand to give you information and support.  A range of refreshments are available.

Dementia Friends

Dementia Friends is a programme created by the Alzheimer’s Society to give people an understanding of what it's like to live with dementia and the small things everyone can do to make a difference to people living with the condition.

If you would like to become a dementia friend you just need to follow these simple steps and you'll learn some handy hints and tips to help people with dementia, should you come across someone who needs a helping hand. You'll also receive a friendship information pack and a pin badge to identify you as a dementia friend. 

How to become a dementia friend:

  1. Visit www.dementiafriends.org.uk and watch the video (4 minutes)
  2. Sign up - just submit your name, email address and address (less than 1 minute)

So, next time you see someone struggling to remember the words to say, getting confused or looking a little lost, you’ll know the right things to say and do to help them to continue to live well independently.