Public’s views over 20-year growth plan considered

Local Plan Published: Monday, 5th February 2018

Warrington Borough Council is making good progress in working through the thousands of public representations received over the Local Plan.

The consultation over the Local Plan Preferred Development Option - which ran from July to September last year - received around 4,000 responses. The Council needs to take into account all of these representations as it prepares the formal draft version of the Local Plan.

The draft Local Plan is programmed to be published in autumn / winter 2018. It will then be subject to a further period of public consultation.

The Council will confirm a more detailed programme for the preparation of the Local Plan in due course.

Warrington Borough Council Leader, Cllr Terry O’Neill, said: “Our Local Plan will play a central role in our growth and development over the next two decades, and as such will affect everyone who lives and works here. That’s why it’s great news that so many people engaged in the consultation and that their views can help shape the plan.

“We are committed to fully taking on-board every single response, but the many thousands we have received means that it is taking some time. Our officers are working hard to complete this, and we will be updating people on the next stages, and timescales, in the near future.”

The Preferred Development Option sets out how Warrington can meet its development needs of approximately 24,000 new homes and 381 hectares of employment land, over the next 20 years.

It identifies four main areas of growth – the Town Centre, the Waterfront, the Garden Suburb and the South West Urban Extension – together with the infrastructure required to ensure Warrington’s long term growth is sustainable. 

About the Local Plan

•    Under government policy, every local planning authority is expected to deliver sustainable economic growth through up-to-date Local Plans which contain strategies and initiatives to achieve their aims.
•    Not progressing a Local Plan will mean that the Council risks losing control over the location, amount and quality of new development. There is also a risk that if the Council does not make sufficient progress in reviewing its Local Plan, the Secretary of State will take over Plan preparation