Everyone wants a health and social care system to be proud of, one that’s fit for the future and built to last.

Here in Warrington, these organisations are working in partnership to deliver just that.

  • Warrington and Halton Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust (WHH)
  • Warrington Borough Council (WBC)
  • NHS Warrington Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG)
  • Bridgewater Community Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust (BW)
  • North West Boroughs Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust (NWB)
  • Police and Crime Commissioner for Cheshire
  • Primary care representatives
  • Warrington Third Sector Health and Wellbeing Alliance

All these agencies are creating an integrated care system (ICS) for Warrington in line with the new NHS Long Term Plan and the government’s expectation that all parts of England will have joined up systems by 2021.

    What is integrated care?

    Integrated care is where health and social care services are joined up so that citizens, not service providers, come first. Warrington Together officers are developing health and social care models based on peoples’ needs and where they live rather than existing organisational structures.

    A more joined up approach means services delivered closer to where people, services that are joined up so that people aren’t passed around between agencies, and where people have the freedom to use local third sector services and develop personal and community assets.

    Our vision for Warrington

    Warrington Together means health and social care services working together, with local residents, to create a healthier, happier Warrington.

    Partners will build on strong foundations to make better use of precious resources. Services will be brought together at convenient locations borough-wide, where residents can access the ongoing support they need to manage their own health and wellbeing. Those who need help the most can rely on the most support.

    Local residents will play a key role in shaping the delivery of health and social care provision. Rising demand and limited resources mean we can’t afford to carry on doing what we’ve always done – but what we do in the future depends on what we learn from listening carefully to local people, service users and our staff.

    The case for change

    The health and social care system is under enormous strain as agencies try to cope simultaneously with rising demand, staff shortages and unprecedented financial pressures. The existing system is unsustainable and in urgent need of reform.

    Citizens want the best possible services – services that: 

    • put people, not providers, first; 
    • are close to where they live;  
    • are joined up so that they are not passed around between agencies.

    Professionals want to deliver high quality care and support that:  

    • improves quality of life, raises life expectancy and reduces inequality;
    • cuts through bureaucracy to deliver care faster; 
    • offers a more exciting and fulfilling portfolio of careers in health and social care.

    Service providers want to work more closely together to:   

    • share resources to address the increasing demands on our health and social care system;
    • meet the long term needs of an ageing population;
    • make the most of the funding that comes into Warrington’s public services.
    Programme objectives
    • Improving quality of life for all citizens
    • Narrowing the gap between differences in life expectancy quality of life across Warrington communities
    • Reducing A&E attendances/admissions and emergency ambulance call-outs
    • More residents self-managing their health and care, and those with long term conditions having access to their own care record and shared care plan
    • Involving the borough’s health and social care workforce in developing and delivering more effective services
    • Greater use of digital technologies to create better, smoother support pathways and more control over individual wellbeing
    Consultation

    Rising demand and limited resources mean we can’t afford to carry on doing what we’ve always done – but what we do in the future depends on what we learn from listening carefully to local people, service users and our staff.

    Local residents will play a key role in shaping the delivery of health and social care provision. They will tell us what they need and help shape change. We will be led by the best ideas, wherever they originate – and there will be no significant change without full consultation.